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· 4 мин. прочитано

Electron 29.0.0 вышел! It includes upgrades to Chromium 122.0.6261.39, V8 12.2, and Node.js 20.9.0.


Команда Electron рада объявить о выпуске Electron 29.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release.

If you have any feedback, please share it with us on Twitter or Mastodon, or join our community Discord! Bugs and feature requests can be reported in Electron's issue tracker.

Notable Changes

Highlights

  • Added a new top-level webUtils module, a renderer process module that provides a utility layer to interact with Web API objects. The first available API in the module is webUtils.getPathForFile. Electron's previous File.path augmentation was a deviation from web standards; this new API is more in line with current web standards behavior.

Stack Changes

Electron 29 upgrades Chromium from 120.0.6099.56 to 122.0.6261.39, Node from 18.18.2 to 20.9.0, and V8 from 12.0 to 12.2.

New Features

  • Added new webUtils module, a utility layer to interact with Web API objects, to replace File.path augmentation. #38776
  • Added net module to utility process. #40890
  • Added a new Electron Fuse, grantFileProtocolExtraPrivileges, that opts the file:// protocol into more secure and restrictive behaviour that matches Chromium. #40372
  • Added an option in protocol.registerSchemesAsPrivileged to allow V8 code cache in custom schemes. #40544
  • Migrated app.{set|get}LoginItemSettings(settings) to use Apple's new recommended underlying framework on macOS 13.0+. #37244

Критические изменения

Behavior Changed: ipcRenderer can no longer be sent over the contextBridge

Attempting to send the entire ipcRenderer module as an object over the contextBridge will now result in an empty object on the receiving side of the bridge. This change was made to remove / mitigate a security footgun. You should not directly expose ipcRenderer or its methods over the bridge. Instead, provide a safe wrapper like below:

contextBridge.exposeInMainWorld('app', {
onEvent: (cb) => ipcRenderer.on('foo', (e, ...args) => cb(args)),
});

Removed: renderer-process-crashed event on app

The renderer-process-crashed event on app has been removed. Use the new render-process-gone event instead.

// Removed
app.on('renderer-process-crashed', (event, webContents, killed) => {
/* ... */
});

// Replace with
app.on('render-process-gone', (event, webContents, details) => {
/* ... */
});

Removed: crashed event on WebContents and <webview>

The crashed events on WebContents and <webview> have been removed. Use the new render-process-gone event instead.

// Removed
win.webContents.on('crashed', (event, killed) => {
/* ... */
});
webview.addEventListener('crashed', (event) => {
/* ... */
});

// Replace with
win.webContents.on('render-process-gone', (event, details) => {
/* ... */
});
webview.addEventListener('render-process-gone', (event) => {
/* ... */
});

Removed: gpu-process-crashed event on app

The gpu-process-crashed event on app has been removed. Use the new child-process-gone event instead.

// Removed
app.on('gpu-process-crashed', (event, killed) => {
/* ... */
});

// Replace with
app.on('child-process-gone', (event, details) => {
/* ... */
});

Окончание поддержки версии 26.x.y

Electron 26.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

E29 (Feb'24)E30 (Apr'24)E31 (Jun'24)
29.x.y30.x.y31.x.y
28.x.y29.x.y30.x.y
27.x.y28.x.y29.x.y

Что дальше

Did you know that Electron recently added a community Request for Comments (RFC) process? If you want to add a feature to the framework, RFCs can be a useful tool to start a dialogue with maintainers on its design. You can also see upcoming changes being discussed in the Pull Requests. To learn more, check out our Introducing electron/rfcs blog post, or check out the README of the electron/rfcs repository directly.

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 3 мин. прочитано

Electron’s API Working Group is adopting an open Requests for Comments (RFC) process to help shepherd larger changes to Electron core.

Why RFCs?

In short, we want to smooth out the process of landing significant changes to Electron core.

Currently, new code changes are mostly discussed through issues and pull requests on GitHub. For most changes to Electron, this is a good system. Many bug fixes, documentation changes, and even new features are straightforward enough to review and merge asynchronously through standard GitHub flows.

For changes that are more significant—for instance, large API surfaces or breaking changes that would affect the majority of Electron apps—it makes sense for review to happen at the ideation stage before most of the code is written.

This process is designed to be open to the public, which will also make it easier for the open source community at large to give feedback on potential changes before they land in Electron.

Как это работает?

The entire RFC process lives in the electron/rfcs repository on GitHub. The steps are described in detail in the repository README.

In brief, an RFC is Proposed once a PR is made to the electron/rfcs repository. A Proposed RFC becomes:

  • Active when the PR is merged into the main branch of the repository, which means that Electron maintainers are amenable to an implementation in electron/electron, or
  • Declined if the PR is ultimately rejected.
информация

For the RFC to become Active, the PR must be approved by at least 2 API Working Group members. Before merging, the RFC should be presented synchronously and accepted unanimously by a quorum of at least two-thirds of the WG members. If consensus is reached, a one-month final comment period will be triggered, after which the PR will be merged.

An Active RFC is Completed if the implementation has been merged into electron/electron.

Who can participate?

Anyone in the Electron community can submit RFCs or leave feedback on the electron/rfcs repository!

We wanted to make this process a two-way dialogue and encourage community participation to get a diverse set of opinions from Electron apps that might consume these APIs in the future. If you’re interested in leaving feedback on currently proposed RFCs, the Electron maintainers have already created a few:

Credits

Electron's RFC process was modeled on many established open source RFC processes. Inspiration for many ideas and major portions of copywriting go to:

· 4 мин. прочитано

Earlier today, the Electron team was alerted to several public CVEs recently filed against several notable Electron apps. The CVEs are related to two of Electron’s fuses - runAsNode and enableNodeCliInspectArguments - and incorrectly claim that a remote attacker is able to execute arbitrary code via these components if they have not been actively disabled.

We do not believe that these CVEs were filed in good faith. First of all, the statement is incorrect - the configuration does not enable remote code execution. Secondly, companies called out in these CVEs have not been notified despite having bug bounty programs. Lastly, while we do believe that disabling the components in question enhances app security, we do not believe that the CVEs have been filed with the correct severity. “Critical” is reserved for issues of the highest danger, which is certainly not the case here.

Anyone is able to request a CVE. While this is good for the overall health of the software industry, “farming CVEs” to bolster the reputation of a single security researcher is not helpful.

That said, we understand that the mere existence of a CVE with the scary critical severity might lead to end user confusion, so as a project, we’d like to offer guidance and assistance in dealing with the issue.

How might this impact me?

After reviewing the CVEs, the Electron team believes that these CVEs are not critical.

An attacker needs to already be able to execute arbitrary commands on the machine, either by having physical access to the hardware or by having achieved full remote code execution. This bears repeating: The vulnerability described requires an attacker to already have access to the attacked system.

Chrome, for example, does not consider physically-local attacks in their threat model:

We consider these attacks outside Chrome's threat model, because there is no way for Chrome (or any application) to defend against a malicious user who has managed to log into your device as you, or who can run software with the privileges of your operating system user account. Such an attacker can modify executables and DLLs, change environment variables like PATH, change configuration files, read any data your user account owns, email it to themselves, and so on. Such an attacker has total control over your device, and nothing Chrome can do would provide a serious guarantee of defense. This problem is not special to Chrome ­— all applications must trust the physically-local user.

The exploit described in the CVEs allows an attacker to then use the impacted app as a generic Node.js process with inherited TCC permissions. So if the app, for example, has been granted access to the address book, the attacker can run the app as Node.js and execute arbitrary code which will inherit that address book access. This is commonly known as a “living off the land” attack. Attackers usually use PowerShell, Bash, or similar tools to run arbitrary code.

Am I impacted?

By default, all released versions of Electron have the runAsNode and enableNodeCliInspectArguments features enabled. If you have not turned them off as described in the Electron Fuses documentation, your app is equally vulnerable to being used as a “living off the land” attack. Again, we need to stress that an attacker needs to already be able to execute code and programs on the victim’s machine.

Mitigation

The easiest way to mitigate this issue is to disable the runAsNode fuse within your Electron app. The runAsNode fuse toggles whether the ELECTRON_RUN_AS_NODE environment variable is respected or not. Please see the Electron Fuses documentation for information on how to toggle theses fuses.

Please note that if this fuse is disabled, then process.fork in the main process will not function as expected as it depends on this environment variable to function. Instead, we recommend that you use Utility Processes, which work for many use cases where you need a standalone Node.js process (like a Sqlite server process or similar scenarios).

You can find more info about security best practices we recommend for Electron apps in our Security Checklist.

· 3 мин. прочитано

Electron 28.0.0 вышел! It includes upgrades to Chromium 120.0.6099.56, V8 12.0, and Node.js 18.18.2.


Команда Electron рада объявить о выпуске Electron 28.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release.

If you have any feedback, please share it with us on Twitter or Mastodon, or join our community Discord! Bugs and feature requests can be reported in Electron's issue tracker.

Notable Changes

Highlights

  • Implemented support for ECMAScript modules or ESM (What are ECMAScript modules? learn more here. This includes support for ESM in Electron proper, as well as areas such as the UtilityProcess API entrypoints. See our ESM documentation for more details.
  • In addition to enabling ESM support in Electron itself, Electron Forge also supports using ESM to package, build and develop Electron applications. You can find this support in Forge v7.0.0 or higher.

Stack Changes

New Features

  • Enabled ESM support. #37535
  • Added ESM entrypoints to the UtilityProcess API. #40047
  • Added several properties to the display object including detected, maximumCursorSize, and nativeOrigin. #40554
  • Added support for ELECTRON_OZONE_PLATFORM_HINT environment variable on Linux. #39792

Критические изменения

Behavior Changed: WebContents.backgroundThrottling set to false affects all WebContents in the host BrowserWindow

WebContents.backgroundThrottling set to false will disable frames throttling in the BrowserWindow for all WebContents displayed by it.

Removed: BrowserWindow.setTrafficLightPosition(position)

BrowserWindow.setTrafficLightPosition(position) has been removed, the BrowserWindow.setWindowButtonPosition(position) API should be used instead which accepts null instead of { x: 0, y: 0 } to reset the position to system default.

// Removed in Electron 28
win.setTrafficLightPosition({ x: 10, y: 10 });
win.setTrafficLightPosition({ x: 0, y: 0 });

// Replace with
win.setWindowButtonPosition({ x: 10, y: 10 });
win.setWindowButtonPosition(null);

Removed: BrowserWindow.getTrafficLightPosition()

BrowserWindow.getTrafficLightPosition() has been removed, the BrowserWindow.getWindowButtonPosition() API should be used instead which returns null instead of { x: 0, y: 0 } when there is no custom position.

// Removed in Electron 28
const pos = win.getTrafficLightPosition();
if (pos.x === 0 && pos.y === 0) {
// No custom position.
}

// Replace with
const ret = win.getWindowButtonPosition();
if (ret === null) {
// No custom position.
}

Removed: ipcRenderer.sendTo()

The ipcRenderer.sendTo() API has been removed. It should be replaced by setting up a MessageChannel between the renderers.

The senderId and senderIsMainFrame properties of IpcRendererEvent have been removed as well.

Removed: app.runningUnderRosettaTranslation

The app.runningUnderRosettaTranslation property has been removed. Use app.runningUnderARM64Translation instead.

// Removed
console.log(app.runningUnderRosettaTranslation);
// Replace with
console.log(app.runningUnderARM64Translation);

Окончание поддержки версии 25.x.y

Electron 25.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

E28 (Dec'23)E29 (Feb'24)E30 (Apr'24)
28.x.y29.x.y30.x.y
27.x.y28.x.y29.x.y
26.x.y27.x.y28.x.y

Что дальше

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 5 мин. прочитано

Reflecting on the improvements and changes in Electron's developer ecosystem in 2023.


In the past few months, we've been cooking up some changes across the Electron ecosystem to supercharge the developer experience for Electron apps! Here’s a swift rundown of the latest additions straight from Electron HQ.

Electron Forge 7 and beyond

Electron Forge 7 — the newest major version of our all-in-one tool for packaging and distributing Electron applications — is now available.

While Forge 6 was a complete rewrite from v5, v7 is smaller in scope but still contains a few breaking changes. Going forward, we will continue to publish major versions of Forge as breaking changes need to be made.

For more details, see the full Forge v7.0.0 changelog on GitHub.

Важные изменения

  • Switched to notarytool for macOS notarization: As of 2023-11-01, Apple sunset the legacy altool for macOS notarization, and this release removes it from Electron Forge entirely.
  • Minimum Node.js increased to v16.4.0: With this release, we’ve set the minimum required Node.js version to 16.4.0.
  • Dropped support for electron-prebuilt and electron-prebuilt-compile: electron-prebuilt was the original name for Electron’s npm module, but was replaced by electron in v1.3.1. electron-prebuilt-compile was an alternative to that binary that came with enhanced DX features, but was eventually abandoned as a project.

Highlights

  • Google Cloud Storage publisher: As part of our push to better support static auto updating, Electron Forge now supports publishing directly to Google Cloud Storage!
  • ESM forge.config.js support: Electron Forge now supports ESM forge.config.js files. (P.S. Look forward to ESM entrypoint support in Electron 28.)
  • Makers now run in parallel: In Electron Forge 6, Makers ran sequentially for ✨ legacy ✨ reasons. Since then, we’ve tested out parallelization for the Make step with no adverse side effects, so you should see a speed-up when building multiple targets for the same platform!
Thank you!

🙇 Big thanks to mahnunchik for the contributions for both the GCS Publisher and ESM support in Forge configurations!

Better static storage auto updates

Squirrel.Windows and Squirrel.Mac are platform-specific updater technologies that back Electron’s built-in autoUpdater module. Both projects support auto updates via two methods:

  • A Squirrel-compatible update server
  • A manifest URL hosted on a static storage provider (e.g. AWS, Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure, etc.)

The update server method has traditionally been the recommended approach for Electron apps (and provides additional customization of update logic), but it has a major downside—it requires apps to maintain their own server instance if they are closed-source.

On the other hand, the static storage method has always been possible, but was undocumented within Electron and poorly supported across Electron tooling packages.

With some great work from @MarshallOfSound, the update story for serverless automatic app updates has been drastically streamlined:

  • Electron Forge’s Zip and Squirrel.Windows makers can now be configured to output autoUpdater-compatible update manifests.
  • A new major version of update-electron-app (v2.0.0) can now read these generated manifests as an alternative to the update.electronjs.org server.

Once your Makers and Publishers are configured to upload update manifests to cloud file storage, you can enable auto updates with only a few lines of configuration:

const { updateElectronApp, UpdateSourceType } = require('update-electron-app');

updateElectronApp({
updateSource: {
type: UpdateSourceType.StaticStorage,
baseUrl: `https://my-manifest.url/${process.platform}/${process.arch}`,
},
});
Дополнительная литература

📦 Want to learn more? For a detailed guide, see Forge’s auto update documentation.

The @electron/ extended universe

When Electron first started, the community published many packages to enhance the experience of developing, packaging, and distributing Electron apps. Over time, many of these packages were incorporated into Electron’s GitHub organization, with the core team taking on the maintenance burden.

In 2022, we began unifying all these first-party tools under the @electron/ namespace on npm. This change means that packages that used to be electron-foo are now @electron/foo on npm, and repositories that used to be named electron/electron-foo are now electron/foo on GitHub. These changes help clearly delineate first-party projects from userland projects. This includes many commonly used packages, such as:

  • @electron/asar
  • @electron/fuses
  • @electron/get
  • @electron/notarize
  • @electron/osx-sign
  • @electron/packager
  • @electron/rebuild
  • @electron/remote
  • @electron/symbolicate-mac
  • @electron/universal

Going forward, all first-party packages we release will also be in the @electron/ namespace. There are two exceptions to this rule:

  • Electron core will continue to be published under the electron package.
  • Electron Forge will continue to publish all of its monorepo packages under the @electron-forge/ namespace.
Star seeking

⭐ During this process, we also accidentally took the electron/packager repository private, which has the unfortunate side effect of erasing our GitHub star count (over 9000 before the erasure). If you are an active user of Packager, we’d appreciate a ⭐ Star ⭐!

Introducing @electron/windows-sign

Starting on 2023-06-01, industry standards began requiring keys for Windows code signing certificates to be stored on FIPS-compliant hardware.

In practice, this meant that code signing became a lot harder for apps that build and sign in CI environments, since many Electron tools take in a certificate file and password as config parameters and attempt to sign from there using hardcoded logic.

This situation has been a common pain point for Electron developers, which is why we have been working on a better solution that isolates Windows code signing into its own standalone step, similar to what @electron/osx-sign does on macOS.

In the future, we plan on fully integrating this package into the Electron Forge toolchain, but it currently lives on its own. The package is currently available for installation at npm install --save-dev @electron/windows-sign and can used programmatically or via CLI.

Please try it out and give us your feedback in the repo’s issue tracker!

What's next?

We'll be entering our annual December quiet period next month. While we do, we'll be thinking about how we can make the Electron development experience even better in 2024.

Is there anything you'd like to see us work on next? Дайте нам знать!

· 2 мин. прочитано

The Electron project will pause for the month of December 2023, then return to full speed in January 2024.

via GIPHY


What will be the same in December

  1. Zero-day and other major security-related releases will be published as necessary. Security incidents should be reported via SECURITY.md.
  2. Code of Conduct reports and moderation will continue.

What will be different in December

  1. Electron 28.0.0 will be released on December 5th. After Electron 28, there will be no new Stable releases in December.
  2. No Nightly and Alpha releases for the last two weeks of December.
  3. With few exceptions, no pull request reviews or merges.
  4. No issue tracker updates on any repositories.
  5. No Discord debugging help from maintainers.
  6. No social media content updates.

Going forward

This is our third year running our quiet period experiment, and we've had a lot of success so far in balancing a month of rest with maintaining our normal release cadence afterwards. Therefore, we've decided to make this a regular part of our release calendar going forward. We'll still be putting a reminder into the last stable release of every calendar year.

See you all in 2024!

· 3 мин. прочитано

Electron 27.0.0 вышел! Он включает обновления Chromium 118.0.5993.32, V8 11.8 и Node.js 18.17.1.


Команда Electron рада объявить о выпуске Electron 27.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release.

If you have any feedback, please share it with us on Twitter or Mastodon, or join our community Discord! Bugs and feature requests can be reported in Electron's issue tracker.

Notable Changes

Stack Changes

Критические изменения

Removed: macOS 10.13 / 10.14 support

macOS 10.13 (High Sierra) and macOS 10.14 (Mojave) are no longer supported by Chromium.

Older versions of Electron will continue to run on these operating systems, but macOS 10.15 (Catalina) or later will be required to run Electron v27.0.0 and higher.

Устарело: ipcRenderer.sendTo()

The ipcRenderer.sendTo() API has been deprecated. It should be replaced by setting up a MessageChannel between the renderers.

The senderId and senderIsMainFrame properties of IpcRendererEvent have been deprecated as well.

Removed: color scheme events in systemPreferences

The following systemPreferences events have been removed:

  • inverted-color-scheme-changed
  • high-contrast-color-scheme-changed

Use the new updated event on the nativeTheme module instead.

// Removed
systemPreferences.on('inverted-color-scheme-changed', () => {
/* ... */
});
systemPreferences.on('high-contrast-color-scheme-changed', () => {
/* ... */
});

// Replace with
nativeTheme.on('updated', () => {
/* ... */
});

Удален: webContents.getPrinters

The webContents.getPrinters method has been removed. Используйте вместо него webContents.getPrintersAsync.

const w = new BrowserWindow({ show: false });

// Removed
console.log(w.webContents.getPrinters());
// Replace with
w.webContents.getPrintersAsync().then((printers) => {
console.log(printers);
});

Removed: systemPreferences.{get,set}AppLevelAppearance and systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance

The systemPreferences.getAppLevelAppearance and systemPreferences.setAppLevelAppearance methods have been removed, as well as the systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance property. Вместо этого используйте модуль nativeTheme.

// Removed
systemPreferences.getAppLevelAppearance();
// Replace with
nativeTheme.shouldUseDarkColors;

// Removed
systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance;
// Replace with
nativeTheme.shouldUseDarkColors;

// Removed
systemPreferences.setAppLevelAppearance('dark');
// Replace with
nativeTheme.themeSource = 'dark';

Removed: alternate-selected-control-text value for systemPreferences.getColor

The alternate-selected-control-text value for systemPreferences.getColor has been removed. Вместо него используйте selected-content-background.

// Removed
systemPreferences.getColor('alternate-selected-control-text');
// Replace with
systemPreferences.getColor('selected-content-background');

New Features

  • Added app accessibility transparency settings api #39631
  • Added support for chrome.scripting extension APIs #39675
  • Enabled WaylandWindowDecorations by default #39644

Окончание поддержки версии 24.x.y

Поддержка Electron 24.x.y подошла к концу в соответствии с политикой поддержки. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

E27 (Oct'23)E28 (Dec'23)E29 (Feb'24)
27.x.y28.x.y29.x.y
26.x.y27.x.y28.x.y
25.x.y26.x.y27.x.y

End of Extended Support for 22.x.y

Earlier this year, the Electron team extended Electron 22's planned end of life date from May 30, 2023 to October 10, 2023, in order to match Chrome's extended support for Windows 7/8/8.1 (see Farewell, Windows 7/8/8.1 for more details).

Electron 22.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy and this support extension. This will drop support back to the latest three stable major versions, and will end official support for Windows 7/8/8.1.

Что дальше

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 4 мин. прочитано

It’s been more than a week since CVE-2023-4863: Heap buffer overflow in WebP was made public, leading to a flurry of new releases of software rendering webp images: macOS, iOS, Chrome, Firefox, and various Linux distributions all received updates. This followed investigations by Citizen Lab, discovering that an iPhone used by a “Washington DC-based civil society organization” was under attack using a zero-click exploit within iMessage.

Electron, too, spun into action and released new versions the same day: If your app renders any user-provided content, you should update your version of Electron - v27.0.0-beta.2, v26.2.1, v25.8.1, v24.8.3, and v22.3.24 all contain a fixed version of libwebp, the library responsible for rendering webp images.

Now that we are all freshly aware that an interaction as innocent as “rendering an image” is a potentially dangerous activity, we want to use this opportunity to remind everyone that Electron comes with a process sandbox that will limit the blast radius of the next big attack — whatever it may be.

The sandbox was available ever since Electron v1 and enabled by default in v20, but we know that many apps (especially those that have been around for a while) may have a sandbox: false somewhere in their code – or a nodeIntegration: true, which equally disables the sandbox when there is no explicit sandbox setting. That’s understandable: If you’ve been with us for a long time, you probably enjoyed the power of throwing a require("child_process") or require("fs") into the same code that runs your HTML/CSS.

Before we talk about how you migrate to the sandbox, let’s first discuss why you want it.

The sandbox puts a hard cage around all renderer processes, ensuring that no matter what happens inside, code is executed inside a restricted environment. As a concept, it's a lot older than Chromium, and provided as a feature by all major operating systems. Electron's and Chromium's sandbox build on top of these system features. Even if you never display user-generated content, you should consider the possibility that your renderer might get compromised: Scenarios as sophisticated as supply chain attacks and as simple as little bugs can lead to your renderer doing things you didn't fully intend for it to do.

The sandbox makes that scenario a lot less scary: A process inside gets to freely use CPU cycles and memory — that’s it. Processes cannot write to disk or display their own windows. In the case of our libwep bug, the sandbox makes sure that an attacker cannot install or run malware. In fact, in the case of the original Pegasus attack on the employee’s iPhone, the attack specifically targeted a non-sandboxed image process to gain access to the phone, first breaking out of the boundaries of the normally sandboxed iMessage. When a CVE like the one in this example is announced, you still have to upgrade your Electron apps to a secure version — but in the meantime, the amount of damage an attacker can do is limited dramatically.

Migrating a vanilla Electron application from sandbox: false to sandbox: true is an undertaking. I know, because even though I have personally written the first draft of the Electron Security Guidelines, I have not managed to migrate one of my own apps to use it. That changed this weekend, and I recommend that you change it, too.

Don’t be scared by the number of line changes, most of it is in &lt;code&gt;package-lock.json&lt;/code&gt;

There are two things you need to tackle:

  1. If you’re using Node.js code in either preload scripts or the actual WebContents, you need to move all that Node.js interaction to the main process (or, if you are fancy, a utility process). Given how powerful renderers have become, chances are high that the vast majority of your code doesn’t really need refactoring.

    Consult our documentation on Inter-Process Communication. In my case, I moved a lot of code and wrapped it in ipcRenderer.invoke() and ipcMain.handle(), but the process was straightforward and quickly done. Be a little mindful of your APIs here - if you build an API called executeCodeAsRoot(code), the sandbox won't protect your users much.

  2. Since enabling the sandbox disables Node.js integration in your preload scripts, you can no longer use require("../my-script"). In other words, your preload script needs to be a single file.

    There are multiple ways to do that: Webpack, esbuild, parcel, and rollup will all get the job done. I used Electron Forge’s excellent Webpack plugin, users of the equally popular electron-builder can use electron-webpack.

All in all, the entire process took me around four days — and that includes a lot of scratching my head at how to wrangle Webpack’s massive power, since I decided to use the opportunity to refactor my code in plenty of other ways, too.

· 2 мин. прочитано

Electron 26.0.0 вышел! Он включает обновления Chromium 116.0.5845.62, V8 11.2 и Node.js 18.16.1. Read below for more details!


Команда Electron рада объявить о выпуске Electron 26.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release.

If you have any feedback, please share it with us on Twitter, or join our community Discord! Bugs and feature requests can be reported in Electron's issue tracker.

Notable Changes

Stack Changes

Критические изменения

Устарело: webContents.getPrinters

Метод webContents.getPrinters устарел. Используйте вместо него webContents.getPrintersAsync.

const w = new BrowserWindow({ show: false });

// Устарел
console.log(w.webContents.getPrinters());
// Замените на
w.webContents.getPrintersAsync().then((printers) => {
console.log(printers);
});

Устарело: systemPreferences.{get,set}AppLevelAppearance и systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance

Методы systemPreferences.getAppLevelAppearance и systemPreferences.setAppLevelAppearance устарели, так же как и свойство systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance. Вместо этого используйте модуль nativeTheme.

// Устарело
systemPreferences.getAppLevelAppearance();
// Замените на
nativeTheme.shouldUseDarkColors;

// Устарело
systemPreferences.appLevelAppearance;
// Замените на
nativeTheme.shouldUseDarkColors;

// Устарело
systemPreferences.setAppLevelAppearance('dark');
// Замените на
nativeTheme.themeSource = 'dark';

Устарело: значение alternate-selected-control-text для systemPreferences.getColor

Значение alternate-selected-control-text для systemPreferences.getColor устарело. Вместо него используйте selected-content-background.

// Устарело
systemPreferences.getColor('alternate-selected-control-text');
// Замените на
systemPreferences.getColor('selected-content-background');

New Features

  • Добавлены safeStorage.setUsePlainTextEncryption и safeStorage.getSelectedStorageBackend api. #39107
  • Добавлены safeStorage.setUsePlainTextEncryption и safeStorage.getSelectedStorageBackend api. #39155
  • Добавлено senderIsMainFrame для сообщений, отправленных с помощью ipcRenderer.sendTo(). #39206
  • Добавлена поддержка пометки о том, что Меню вызвано нажатием на клавиатуру. #38954

Окончание поддержки версии 23.x.y

Поддержка Electron 23.x.y подошла к концу в соответствии с политикой поддержки. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

E26 (Aug'23)E27 (Oct'23)E28 (Янв'24)
26.x.y27.x.y28.x.y
25.x.y26.x.y27.x.y
24.x.y25.x.y26.x.y
22.x.y

Что дальше

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 5 мин. прочитано

Electron 25.0.0 вышел! Он включает обновления Chromium 114, V8 11.4 и Node.js 18.15.0. Read below for more details!


Команда Electron рада объявить о выпуске Electron 25.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release.

If you have any feedback, please share it with us on Twitter, or join our community Discord! Bugs and feature requests can be reported in Electron's issue tracker.

Notable Changes

Highlights

  • Implemented net.fetch within Electron's net module, using Chromium's networking stack. This differs from Node's fetch(), which uses Node.js' HTTP stack. See #36733 and #36606.
  • Added protocol.handle, which replaces and deprecates protocol.{register,intercept}{String,Buffer,Stream,Http,File}Protocol. #36674
  • Extended support for Electron 22, in order to match Chromium and Microsoft's Windows 7/8/8.1 deprecation plan. See additional details at the end of this blog post.

Stack Changes

Критические изменения

Obsoleto: protocol.{register,intercept}{Buffer,String,Stream,File,Http}Protocol

The protocol.register*Protocol and protocol.intercept*Protocol methods have been replaced with protocol.handle.

The new method can either register a new protocol or intercept an existing protocol, and responses can be of any type.

// Deprecated in Electron 25
protocol.registerBufferProtocol('some-protocol', () => {
callback({ mimeType: 'text/html', data: Buffer.from('<h5>Response</h5>') });
});

// Replace with
protocol.handle('some-protocol', () => {
return new Response(
Buffer.from('<h5>Response</h5>'), // Could also be a string or ReadableStream.
{ headers: { 'content-type': 'text/html' } }
);
});
// Deprecated in Electron 25
protocol.registerHttpProtocol('some-protocol', () => {
callback({ url: 'https://electronjs.org' });
});

// Replace with
protocol.handle('some-protocol', () => {
return net.fetch('https://electronjs.org');
});
// Deprecated in Electron 25
protocol.registerFileProtocol('some-protocol', () => {
callback({ filePath: '/path/to/my/file' });
});

// Replace with
protocol.handle('some-protocol', () => {
return net.fetch('file:///path/to/my/file');
});

Obsoleto: BrowserWindow.setTrafficLightPosition(position)

BrowserWindow.setTrafficLightPosition(position) has been deprecated, the BrowserWindow.setWindowButtonPosition(position) API should be used instead which accepts null instead of { x: 0, y: 0 } to reset the position to system default.

// Deprecated in Electron 25
win.setTrafficLightPosition({ x: 10, y: 10 });
win.setTrafficLightPosition({ x: 0, y: 0 });

// Replace with
win.setWindowButtonPosition({ x: 10, y: 10 });
win.setWindowButtonPosition(null);

Obsoleto: BrowserWindow.getTrafficLightPosition()

BrowserWindow.getTrafficLightPosition() has been deprecated, the BrowserWindow.getWindowButtonPosition() API should be used instead which returns null instead of { x: 0, y: 0 } when there is no custom position.

// Deprecated in Electron 25
const pos = win.getTrafficLightPosition();
if (pos.x === 0 && pos.y === 0) {
// No custom position.
}

// Replace with
const ret = win.getWindowButtonPosition();
if (ret === null) {
// No custom position.
}

New Features

  • Added net.fetch(). #36733
    • net.fetch supports requests to file: URLs and custom protocols registered with protocol.register*Protocol. #36606
  • Added BrowserWindow.set/getWindowButtonPosition APIs. #37094
  • Added protocol.handle, replacing and deprecating protocol.{register,intercept}{String,Buffer,Stream,Http,File}Protocol. #36674
  • Added a will-frame-navigate event to webContents and the <webview> tag, which fires whenever any frame within the frame hierarchy attempts to navigate. #34418
  • Added initiator information to navigator events. This information allows distinguishing window.open from a parent frame causing a navigation, as opposed to a child-initiated navigation. #37085
  • Added net.resolveHost that resolves hosts using defaultSession object. #38152
  • Added new 'did-resign-active' event to app. #38018
  • Added several standard page size options to webContents.print(). #37159
  • Added the enableLocalEcho flag to the session handler ses.setDisplayMediaRequestHandler() callback for allowing remote audio input to be echoed in the local output stream when audio is a WebFrameMain. #37315
  • Added thermal management information to powerMonitor. #38028
  • Allows an absolute path to be passed to the session.fromPath() API. #37604
  • Exposes the audio-state-changed event on webContents. #37366

22.x.y Continued Support

As noted in Farewell, Windows 7/8/8.1, Electron 22's (Chromium 108) planned end of life date will be extended from May 30, 2023 to October 10, 2023. The Electron team will continue to backport any security fixes that are part of this program to Electron 22 until October 10, 2023. The October support date follows the extended support dates from both Chromium and Microsoft. On October 11, the Electron team will drop support back to the latest three stable major versions, which will no longer support Windows 7/8/8.1.

E25 (May'23)E26 (Aug'23)E27 (Oct'23)
25.x.y26.x.y27.x.y
24.x.y25.x.y26.x.y
23.x.y24.x.y25.x.y
22.x.y22.x.y--

Что дальше

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.