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· 2 min read

Spectron will be deprecated on February 1st, 2022.


Beginning in February 2022, Spectron will be officially deprecated by the Electron team.

Why Deprecate Spectron?

While Spectron has consistently put out new releases for each new version of Electron, the project has had very little maintenance and improvements for well over a year, and currently has no full-time maintainers. With the remote module moving outside of Electron core and into an external module in Electron 14, Spectron will require a major rewrite to continue working reliably.

After reviewing several available options for Spectron's continued maintenance, the Electron team has decided to deprecate Spectron in 2022.

Deprecation Timeline

The following is our planned deprecation timeline:

  • November 2021 - January 2022: The Electron team will continue to accept pull requests from the community.
  • January 2022: A final version of announcement warning about Spectron's deprecation will be released.
  • February 1, 2022: Spectron's repo will be marked as "archived". No more pull requests will be accepted.

Following February 1st, 2022, Electron will continue to leave the Spectron repo up indefinitely, so that others are welcome to fork or use the existing code for their projects. We hope this will help provide a longer transition to any projects that may still depend on Spectron.

Alternatives to Spectron

If you're currently using Spectron in your project and would like to migrate to an alternative testing solution, you can read our guide for automated testing here.

We currently have several other recommended alternatives to Spectron, including Playwright and WebDriverIO. Official tutorials for each option can be found in our Automated Testing documentation.

What's Next

We here on the Electron team appreciate you using Spectron and Electron. We understand that many of you depend on Spectron for testing your apps, and we want to make this transition as painless for you as possible. Thank you for choosing Electron!

· 4 min read

Electron 16.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 96, V8 9.6, and Node.js 16.9.1. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 16.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Electron Release Cadence Change

As of Electron 15, Electron will release a new major stable version every 8 weeks. You can read the full details here.

Additionally, Electron has changed supported versions from latest three versions to latest four versions until May 2022. See our versioning document for more detailed information about versioning in Electron. After May 2022, we will return to supporting latest three versions.

Stack Changes

Highlighted Features

  • Now supports the WebHID API. #30213
  • Add data parameter to app.requestSingleInstanceLock to share data between instances. #30891
  • Pass securityOrigin to media permissions request handler. #31357
  • Add commandLine.removeSwitch. #30933

See the 16.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

Below are breaking changes introduced in Electron 16. More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

Building Native Modules

If your project uses node-gyp to build native modules, you may need to call it with --force-process-config depending on your project's setup and your Electron version. More information about this change can be found at #2497.

Behavior Changed: crashReporter implementation switched to Crashpad on Linux

The underlying implementation of the crashReporter API on Linux has changed from Breakpad to Crashpad, bringing it in line with Windows and Mac. As a result of this, child processes are now automatically monitored, and calling process.crashReporter.start in Node child processes is no longer needed (and is not advisable, as it will start a second instance of the Crashpad reporter).

There are also some subtle changes to how annotations will be reported on Linux, including that long values will no longer be split between annotations appended with __1, __2 and so on, and instead will be truncated at the (new, longer) annotation value limit.

API Changes

There were no API changes in Electron 16.

Removed/Deprecated Changes

  • Usage of the desktopCapturer.getSources API in the renderer has been deprecated and will be removed. This change improves the default security of Electron apps. See here for details on how to replace this API in your app.

End of Support for 12.x.y

Electron 12.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

As of Electron 15, we have changed supported versions from latest three versions to latest four versions until May 2022 with Electron 19. After Electron 19, we will return to supporting the latest three versions. This version support change is part of our new cadence change. Please see our blog post for full details here.

E15 (Sep'21)E16 (Nov'21)E17 (Feb'22)E18 (Mar'22)E19 (May'22)
15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y19.x.y
14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y
13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y
12.x.y13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y--

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is to release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately every 2 months.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 2 min read

The Electron project will pause for the month of December 2021, then return to full speed in January 2022.

via GIPHY


What will be the same in December

  1. Zero-day and other major security-related releases will be published as necessary. Security incidents should be reported via SECURITY.md.
  2. Code of Conduct reports and moderation will continue.

What will be different in December

  1. No new Beta or Stable releases in December. No Nightly releases for the last two weeks of December.
  2. With few exceptions, no pull request reviews or merges.
  3. No issue tracker updates on any repositories.
  4. No Discord debugging help from maintainers.
  5. No social media content updates.

Why is this happening?

In short, while maintainers are happy and engaged with the project, THE WORLD IS TIRED. December is a quiet month for most companies, so we want to give our maintainers a chance to recharge. We encourage other projects to consider similar measures.

Should I be worried about the future of Electron?

No. We are able to take this step because the project is in good shape. Everyone is looking forward to 2022, and we expect good things to come!

· 4 min read

Electron 15.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 94, V8 9.4, and Node.js 16.5.0. We've added API updates to window.open, bug fixes, and general improvements. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 15.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Electron Release Cadence Change

Starting with Electron 15, Electron will release a new major stable version every 8 weeks. You can read the full details here.

Additionally, Electron will be changing supported versions from latest three versions to latest four versions until May 2022. See our versioning documentfor more detailed information about versioning in Electron.

Stack Changes

Highlight Features

  • nativeWindowOpen: true is no longer experimental, and is now the default.
  • Added safeStorage string encryption API. #30430
  • Added 'frame-created' event to WebContents which emits when a frame is created in the page. #30801
  • Added resize edge info to BrowserWindow's will-resize event. #29199

See the 15.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

Below are breaking changes introduced in Electron 15. More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

Default Changed: nativeWindowOpen defaults to true

Prior to Electron 15, window.open was by default shimmed to use BrowserWindowProxy. This meant that window.open('about:blank') did not work to open synchronously scriptable child windows, among other incompatibilities. nativeWindowOpen: true is no longer experimental, and is now the default.

See the documentation for window.open in Electron for more details.

API Changes

  • Added 'frame-created' event to WebContents which emits when a frame is created in the page. #30801
  • Added safeStorage string encryption API. #30430
  • Added signal option to dialog.showMessageBox. #26102
  • Added an Electron Fuse for enforcing code signatures on the app.asar file your application loads. Requires the latest asar module (v3.1.0 or higher). #30900
  • Added fuses to disable NODE_OPTIONS and --inspect debug arguments in packaged apps. #30420
  • Added new MenuItem.userAccelerator property to read user-assigned macOS accelerator overrides. #26682
  • Added new app.runningUnderARM64Translation property to detect when running under Rosetta on Apple Silicon, or WOW on Windows for ARM. #29168
  • Added new imageAnimationPolicy web preference to control how images are animated. #29095
  • Added support for sending Blobs over the context bridge. #29247

Removed/Deprecated Changes

No APIs have been removed or deprecated.

Supported Versions

Starting in Electron 15, we will change supported versions from latest three versions to latest four versions until May 2022 with Electron 19. After Electron 19, we will return to supporting the latest three versions. This version support change is part of our new cadence change. Please see our blog post for full details here.

Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

E15 (Sep'21)E16 (Nov'21)E17 (Feb'22)E18 (Mar'22)E19 (May'22)
15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y19.x.y
14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y
13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y
12.x.y13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y--

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately quarterly.

You can find Electron's public timeline here.

More information about future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

· 6 min read

Electron 14.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 93 and V8 9.3. We've added several API updates, bug fixes, and general improvements. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 14.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Electron Release Cadence Change

Beginning in September 2021 with Electron 15, Electron will release a new major stable version every 8 weeks. You can read the full details here. Electron 15 will begin beta on September 1, 2021 and stable release will be on September 21, 2021. You can find Electron's public timeline here.

Additionally, Electron will be changing supported versions from latest three versions to latest four versions until May 2022. See see our versioning document for more detailed information about versioning in Electron.

Stack Changes

Highlight Features

  • Default Changed: nativeWindowOpen now defaults to true. (see docs)
  • Child windows no longer inherit BrowserWindow construction options from their parents. #28550
  • Added new session.storagePath API to get the path on disk for session-specific data. #28665
  • Added process.contextId used by @electron/remote. #28007
  • Added experimental cookie encryption support behind an Electron Fuse. #29492

See the 14.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

Below are breaking changes introduced in Electron 14. More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

Removed: app.allowRendererProcessReuse

The app.allowRendererProcessReuse property has been removed as part of our plan to more closely align with Chromium's process model for security, performance and maintainability.

For more detailed information see #18397.

Removed: Browser Window Affinity

The affinity option when constructing a new BrowserWindow has been removed as part of our plan to more closely align with Chromium's process model for security, performance and maintainability.

For more detailed information see #18397.

API Changed: window.open()

The optional parameter frameName no longer sets the title of the window. This behavior now follows the specification described by the native documentation for the windowName parameter.

If you were using this parameter to set the title of a window, you can instead use the win.setTitle(title) method.

Removed: worldSafeExecuteJavaScript

worldSafeExecuteJavaScript has been removed with no alternative. Please ensure your code works with this property enabled. It has been enabled by default since Electron 12.

You will be affected by this change if you use either webFrame.executeJavaScript or webFrame.executeJavaScriptInIsolatedWorld. You will need to ensure that values returned by either of those methods are supported by the Context Bridge API as these methods use the same value passing semantics.

Default Changed: nativeWindowOpen defaults to true

Prior to Electron 14, window.open was by default shimmed to use BrowserWindowProxy. This meant that window.open('about:blank') did not work to open synchronously scriptable child windows, among other incompatibilities. nativeWindowOpen is no longer experimental, and is now the default.

See the documentation for window.open in Electron for more details.

Removed: BrowserWindowConstructorOptions inheriting from parent windows

Prior to Electron 14, windows opened with window.open would inherit BrowserWindow constructor options such as transparent and resizable from their parent window. Beginning with Electron 14, this behavior has been removed and windows will not inherit any BrowserWindow constructor options from their parents.

Instead, explicitly set options for the new window with setWindowOpenHandler:

webContents.setWindowOpenHandler((details) => {
return {
action: 'allow',
overrideBrowserWindowOptions: {
// ...
}
}
})

Removed: additionalFeatures

The deprecated additionalFeatures property in the new-window and did-create-window events of WebContents has been removed. Since new-window uses positional arguments, the argument is still present, but will always be the empty array []. (Note: the new-window event itself is already deprecated and has been replaced by setWindowOpenHandler.) Bare keys in window features will now present as keys with the value true in the options object.

// Removed in Electron 14
// Triggered by window.open('...', '', 'my-key')
webContents.on('did-create-window', (window, details) => {
if (details.additionalFeatures.includes('my-key')) {
// ...
}
})

// Replace with
webContents.on('did-create-window', (window, details) => {
if (details.options['my-key']) {
// ...
}
})

Removed: remote module

Deprecated in Electron 12, the remote module has now been removed from Electron itself and extracted into a separate package, @electron/remote. The @electron/remote module bridges JavaScript objects from the main process to the renderer process. This lets you access main-process-only objects as if they were available in the renderer process. This is a direct replacement for the remote module. See the module's readme for migration instructions and reference.

API Changes

  • Added BrowserWindow.isFocusable() method to determine whether a window is focusable. #28642
  • Added WebFrameMain.visibilityState instance property. #28706
  • Added disposition, referrer and postBody to the details object passed to the window open handler registered with setWindowOpenHandler. #28518
  • Added process.contextId used by @electron/remote. #28007
  • Added experimental cookie encryption support behind an Electron Fuse. #29492
  • Added missing resourceType conversions for webRequest listener details: font, ping, cspReport, media, webSocket. #30050
  • Added new session.storagePath API to get the path on disk for session-specific data. #28665
  • Added support for Windows Control Overlay on macOS. #29986
  • Added support for directing Chromium logging to a file with --log-file=.../path/to/file.log. Also, it's now possible to enable logging from JavaScript by appending command-line switches during the first JS tick. #29963
  • Added support for the des-ede3 cipher in node crypto. #27897
  • Added a ContextBridgeMutability feature that allows context bridge objects to be mutated. #27348

Removed/Deprecated Changes

The following APIs have been removed or are now deprecated:

  • The remote module has been removed after being deprecated in Electron 12. #25734
  • Child windows no longer inherit BrowserWindow construction options from their parents. #28550
  • Removed deprecated additionalFeatures property from new-window and did-create-window WebContents events. #28548
  • Removed the deprecated app.allowRendererProcessReuse and BrowserWindow affinity options. #26874
  • The submitURL option for crashReporter.start is no longer a required argument when uploadToServer is false. #28105

End of Support for 11.x.y

Electron 11.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately quarterly.

For information on planned breaking changes in upcoming versions of Electron, see our Planned Breaking Changes.

· 6 min read

Over the past weeks, we’ve received several questions about the differences between the new WebView2 and Electron.

Both teams have the expressed goal of making web-tech the best it can be on the Desktop, and a shared comprehensive comparison is being discussed.

Electron and WebView2 are fast-moving and constantly evolving projects. We have assembled a brief snapshot of similarities and differences between Electron and WebView2 as they exist today.


Architecture Overview

Electron and WebView2 both build from the Chromium source for rendering web content. Strictly speaking, WebView2 builds from the Edge source, but Edge is built using a fork of the Chromium source. Electron does not share any DLLs with Chrome. WebView2 binaries hard link against Edge (Stable channel as of Edge 90), so they share disk and some working set. See Evergreen distribution mode for more info.

Electron apps always bundle and distribute the exact version of Electron with which they were developed. WebView2 has two options in distribution. You can bundle the exact WebView2 library your application was developed with, or you can use a shared-runtime version that may already be present on the system. WebView2 provides tools for each approach, including a bootstrapping installer in case the shared runtime is missing. WebView2 is shipped inbox starting with Windows 11.

Applications that bundle their frameworks are responsible for updating those frameworks, including minor security releases. For apps using the shared WebView2 runtime, WebView2 has its own updater, similar to Chrome or Edge, that runs independent of your application. Updating the application's code or any of its other dependencies is still a responsibility for the developer, same as with Electron. Neither Electron nor WebView2 is managed by Windows Update.

Both Electron and WebView2 inherit Chromium’s multi-process architecture - namely, a single main process that communicates with one-or-more renderer processes. These processes are entirely separate from other applications running on the system. Every Electron application is a separate process tree, containing a root browser-process, some utility processes, and zero or more render processes. WebView2 apps that use the same user data folder (like a suite of apps would do), share non-renderer processes. WebView2 apps using different data folders do not share processes.

  • ElectronJS Process Model:

    ElectronJS Process Model Diagram

  • WebView2 Based Application Process Model:

    WebView2 Process Model Diagram

Read more about WebView2’s process model and Electron’s process model here.

Electron provides APIs for common desktop application needs such as menus, file system access, notifications, and more. WebView2 is a component meant to be integrated into an application framework such as WinForms, WPF, WinUI, or Win32. WebView2 does not provide operating system APIs outside the web standard via JavaScript.

Node.js is integrated into Electron. Electron applications may use any Node.js API, module, or node-native-addon from the renderer and main processes. A WebView2 application does not assume which language or framework the rest of your application is written in. Your JavaScript code must proxy any operating system access through the application-host process.

Electron strives to maintain compatibility with the web API, including APIs developed from the Fugu Project. We have a snapshot of Electron’s Fugu API compatibility. WebView2 maintains a similar list of API differences from Edge.

Electron has a configurable security model for web content, from full-access to full-sandbox. WebView2 content is always sandboxed. Electron has comprehensive security documentation on choosing your security model. WebView2 also has security best practices.

The Electron source is maintained and available on GitHub. Applications can modify can build their own brands of Electron. The WebView2 source is not available on GitHub.

Quick Summary:

ElectronWebView2
Build DependencyChromiumEdge
Source Available on GitHubYesNo
Shares Edge/Chrome DLLsNoYes (as of Edge 90)
Shared Runtime Between ApplicationsNoOptional
Application APIsYesNo
Node.jsYesNo
SandboxOptionalAlways
Requires an Application FrameworkNoYes
Supported PlatformsMac, Win, LinuxWin (Mac/Linux planned)
Process Sharing Between AppsNeverOptional
Framework Updates Managed ByApplicationWebView2

Performance Discussion

When it comes to rendering your web content, we expect little performance difference between Electron, WebView2, and any other Chromium-based renderer. We created scaffolding for apps built using Electron, C++ + WebView2, and C# + WebView2 for those interested to investigate potential performance differences.

There are a few differences that come into play outside of rendering web content, and folks from Electron, WebView2, Edge, and others have expressed interest in working on a detailed comparison including PWAs.

Inter-Process Communication (IPC)

There is one difference we want to highlight immediately, as we believe it is often a performance consideration in Electron apps.

In Chromium, the browser process acts as an IPC broker between sandboxed renderers and the rest of the system. While Electron allows unsandboxed render processes, many apps choose to enable the sandbox for added security. WebView2 always has the sandbox enabled, so for most Electron and WebView2 apps IPC can impact overall performance.

Even though Electron and WebView2 have a similar process models, the underlying IPC differs. Communicating between JavaScript and C++ or C# requires marshalling, most commonly to a JSON string. JSON serialization/parsing is an expensive operation, and IPC-bottlenecks can negatively impact performance. Starting with Edge 93, WV2 will use CBOR for network events.

Electron supports direct IPC between any two processes via the MessagePorts API, which utilize the structured clone algorithm. Applications which leverage this can avoid paying the JSON-serialization tax when sending objects between processes.

Summary

Electron and WebView2 have a number of differences, but don't expect much difference with respect to how they perform rendering web content. Ultimately, an app’s architecture and JavaScript libraries/frameworks have a larger impact on memory and performance than anything else because Chromium is Chromium regardless of where it is running.

Special thanks to the WebView2 team for reviewing this post, and ensuring we have an up-to-date view of the WebView2 architecture. They welcome any feedback on the project.

· 6 min read

Beginning in September 2021, Electron will release a new major stable version every 8 weeks.


In 2019, Electron moved to a 12 week release cycle to match Chromium's 6 week release cycle. Recently, both Chrome and Microsoft announced changes that made us reconsider Electron's current release cadence:

  1. Chromium plans to release a new milestone every 4 weeks, starting with Chrome 94 on September 21st, 2021. This release cadence also adds a new Extended Stable option every 8 weeks, which will contain all updated security fixes.

  2. The Microsoft Store will require Chromium-based apps to be no older than within 2 major versions. As an example, if the latest released major version of Chromium is 85, any browser based on Chromium must be on at least Chromium version 83 or higher. This rule includes Electron apps.

Beginning in September 2021, Electron will release a new major stable version every 8 weeks, to match Chromium's 8 week Extended Stable releases.

Our first release with Chromium Extended Stable will be Electron 15 on September 21st, 2021.

Knowing that a release cadence change will impact other downstream applications, we wanted to let our developer community know as soon as possible. Read on for more details about our 2021 release schedule.

Electron 15: Temporary Alpha

Given that our original Electron 15 release targeted a non-Extended Stable version (Chromium's Extended Stable versions are based on their even-numbered versions), we needed to change our original target release date. However, an Electron app must use the most recent 2 major versions of Chromium to be accepted to the Microsoft Store, which made waiting for two Chromium versions untenable.

With these two requirements, our team faced a timing dilemma. Moving Electron 15 to include Chromium M94 would allow app developers to get on the very first Extended Stable version of Chromium; however, it would also shorten the beta-to-stable cycle to only 3 weeks.

To help with this switchover, Electron will offer a temporary alpha build, only for the Electron 15 release. This alpha build will allow developers more time to test and plan for an Electron 15 release, with a more stable build than our current nightlies.

The alpha channel build will ship for Electron 15 on July 20th, 2021. It will transition to a beta release on September 1st, 2021 with a stable release target of September 21st, 2021. Subsequent Electron releases will not have alpha releases.

2021 Plan for Releases

Below is our current release schedule for 2021:

ElectronChromeAlpha ReleaseBeta ReleaseStable ReleaseStable Cycle (Weeks)
E13M91-2021-Mar-052021-May-2512
E14M93-2021-May-262021-Aug-3114
E15M942021-Jul-202021-Sep-012021-Sep-219 (includes alpha)
E16M96-2021-Sep-222021-Nov-168
E17M98-2021-Nov-172022-Feb-0111

Adding the alpha channel extends the development time before Electron 15's launch from 3 weeks to 9 weeks - closer to our new 8 week cycle, while still meeting the requirements for Windows Store submission.

To further help app developers, for the remainder of 2021 until May 2022, we will also be extending our supported versions policy from the latest 3 versions to the latest 4 versions of Electron. That means that even if you can't immediately alter your upgrade schedule, older versions of Electron will still receive security updates and fixes.

Addressing Concerns

There's a reason we're publishing this post well before this release cycle change is scheduled. We know that a faster release cycle will have a real impact on Electron apps - some of which may already find our major release cadence aggressive.

We've tried to address common concerns below:

❓ Why even make this change? Why not keep the 12 week release cadence?

To deliver the most up-to-date versions of Chromium in Electron, our schedule needs to track theirs. More information around Chromium's release cycle can be found here.

Additionally, the current 12 week release cadence would be untenable with the Microsoft Store's new submission requirements. Even apps on the latest stable version of Electron would experience a roughly two week period where their app may be rejected under the new security requirements.

Every new Chromium release contains new features, bug fixes / security fixes, and V8 improvements. We want you, as app developers, to have these changes in a timely manner, so our stable release dates will continue to match every other Chromium stable release. As an app developer, you'll have access to new Chromium and V8 features and fixes sooner than before.

❓ The existing 12 week release schedule already moves quickly. What steps are the team taking to make upgrading easier?

One advantage of more frequent releases is having smaller releases. We understand that upgrading Electron's major versions can be difficult. We hope that smaller releases will introduce fewer major Chromium and Node changes, as well as fewer breaking changes, per release.

❓ Will there been an alpha release available for future Electron versions?

There are no plans to support a permanent alpha release at this time. This alpha is only intended for Electron 15, as a way to help developers upgrade more easily in the shortened release period.

❓ Will Electron extend the number of supported versions?

We will be extending our supported version policy from the latest three versions to the latest four versions of Electron until May 2022, with the release of Electron 19. After Electron 19 is released, we'll return to supporting the latest three major versions, as well as the beta and nightly releases.

E13 (May'21)E14 (Aug'21)E15 (Sep'21)E16 (Nov'21)E17 (Feb'22)E18 (Mar'22)E19 (May'22)
13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y19.x.y
12.x.y13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y18.x.y
11.x.y12.x.y13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y16.x.y17.x.y
----12.x.y13.x.y14.x.y15.x.y--

Questions?

📨 If you have questions or concerns, please mail us at info@electronjs.org or join our Discord. We know this is a change that will impact many apps and developers, and your feedback is very important to us. We want to hear from you!

· 3 min read

Electron 13.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 91 and V8 9.1. We've added several API updates, bug fixes, and general improvements. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 13.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release, and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Stack Changes

Highlight Features

  • Added process.contextIsolated property that indicates whether the current renderer context has contextIsolation enabled. #28252
  • Added new session.storagePath API to get the path on disk for session-specific data. #28866
  • Deprecated the new-window event of WebContents. It is replaced by webContents.setWindowOpenHandler()
  • Added process.contextId used by @electron/remote. #28251

See the 13.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

  • window.open() parameter frameName is no longer set as window title. #27481
  • Changed session.setPermissionCheckHandler(handler) to allow for handler's first parameter, webContents to be null. #19903

More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

API Changes

  • Added roundedCorners option for BrowserWindow. #27572
  • Added new session.storagePath API to get the path on disk for session-specific data.28866
  • Added support for passing DOM elements over the context bridge. #26776
  • Added process.uptime() to sandboxed renderers. #26684
  • Added missing fields to the parameters emitted as part of the context-menu event.#26788
  • Added support for registering Manifest V3 extension service workers.
  • Added ‘registration-completed’ event to ServiceWorkers. #27562

Removed/Deprecated Changes

The following APIs have been removed or are now deprecated:

  • Deprecated the new-window event of WebContents. It is replaced by webContents.setWindowOpenHandler()

  • Removed deprecated shell.moveItemToTrash(). #26723

  • Removed the following deprecated BrowserWindow extension APIs:

    • BrowserWindow.addExtension(path)

    • BrowserWindow.addDevToolsExtension(path)

    • BrowserWindow.removeExtension(name)

    • BrowserWindow.removeDevToolsExtension(name)

    • BrowserWindow.getExtensions()

    • BrowserWindow.getDevToolsExtensions()

      Use the session APIs instead:

    • ses.loadExtension(path)

    • ses.removeExtension(extension_id)

    • ses.getAllExtensions()

  • The following systemPreferences methods have been deprecated:

    • systemPreferences.isDarkMode()

    • systemPreferences.isInvertedColorScheme()

    • systemPreferences.isHighContrastColorScheme()

      Use the following nativeTheme properties instead:

    • nativeTheme.shouldUseDarkColors

    • nativeTheme.shouldUseInvertedColorScheme

    • nativeTheme.shouldUseHighContrastColors

End of Support for 10.x.y

Electron 10.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately quarterly. The tentative 14.0.0 schedule maps out key dates in the Electron 14.0 development life cycle. Also, see our versioning document for more detailed information about versioning in Electron.

For information on planned breaking changes in upcoming versions of Electron, see our Planned Breaking Changes doc.

· 5 min read

Electron 12.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 89, V8 8.9 and Node.js 14.16. We've added changes to the remote module, new defaults for contextIsolation, a new webFrameMain API, and general improvements. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 12.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. Continue reading for details about this release, and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Stack Changes

Highlight Features

  • The ContextBridge exposeInMainWorld method can now expose non-object APIs. #26834
  • Upgraded from Node 12 to Node 14. #23249
  • Added a new webFrameMain API for accessing sub-frames of a WebContents instance from the main process. #25464
  • The default values of contextIsolation and worldSafeExecuteJavaScript are now true. #27949 #27502

See the 12.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

API Changes

  • Added webFrameMain API: The webFrameMain module can be used to look up frames across existing WebContents instances. This is the main process equivalent of the existing webFrame API. More information about this new API can be found here, and in our documentation.
  • app API changes:
    • Added non-localized serviceName to 'child-process-gone' / app.getAppMetrics(). #25975
    • Added new app.runningUnderRosettaTranslation property to detect when running under rosetta on Apple silicon. #26444
    • Added exitCode to render-process-gone details (app & webContents). #27677
  • BrowserWindow API changes:
    • Added BrowserWindow.isTabletMode() API. #25209
    • Added resized (Windows/macOS) and moved (Windows) events to BrowserWindow. #26216
    • Added new system-context-menu event to allow preventing and overriding the system context menu. #25795
    • Added win.setTopBrowserView() so that BrowserViews can be raised. #27713
    • Added webPreferences.preferredSizeMode to allow sizing views according to their document's minimum size. #25874
  • contextBridge API changes:
    • Allowed ContextBridge exposeInMainWorld method to expose non-object APIs. #26834
  • display API changes:
    • Added displayFrequency property to the Display object to allow getting information about the refresh rate on Windows. #26472
  • extensions API changes:
    • Added support for some chrome.management APIs. #25098
  • MenuItem API changes:
    • Added support for showing macOS share menu. #25629
  • net API changes:
    • Added a new credentials option for net.request(). #25284
    • Added net.online for detecting whether there is currently internet connection. #21004
  • powerMonitor API changes:
    • Added powerMonitor.onBatteryPower. #26494
    • Added fast user switching event to powerMonitor on macOS. #25321
  • session API changes:
    • Added allowFileAccess option to ses.loadExtension() API. #27702
    • Added display-capture API for session.setPermissionRequestHandler. #27696
    • Added a disabledCipherSuites option to session.setSSLConfig. #25818
    • Added extension-loaded, extension-unloaded, and extension-ready events to session. #25385
    • Added session.setSSLConfig() to allow configuring SSL. #25461
    • Added support for explicitly specifying direct, auto_detect or system modes in session.setProxy(). #24937
    • Added Serial API support. #25237
    • Added APIs to enable/disable spell checker. #26276
  • shell API changes:
    • Added a new asynchronous shell.trashItem() API, replacing the synchronous shell.moveItemToTrash(). #25114
  • webContents API changes:
    • Added a small console hint to console to help debug renderer crashes. #25317
    • Added frame and webContents properties to the details object in webRequest handlers. #27334
    • Added webContents.forcefullyCrashRenderer() to forcefully terminate a renderer process to assist with recovering a hung renderer. #25580
    • Added setWindowOpenHandler API for renderer-created child windows, and deprecate new-window event. #24517
  • webFrame API changes:
    • Added spellcheck API to renderer. #25060

Removed/Deprecated Changes

The following APIs have been removed or are now deprecated:

  • Deprecated the remote module. It is replaced by @electron/remote. #25293
  • Removed deprecated crashReporter APIs. #26709
  • Removed links to the Electron website from the default 'Help' menu in packaged apps. #25831

End of Support for 9.x.y

Electron 9.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately quarterly. The tentative 13.0.0 schedule maps out key dates in the Electron 13.0 development life cycle. Also, see our versioning document for more detailed information about versioning in Electron.

For information on planned breaking changes in upcoming versions of Electron, see our Planned Breaking Changes doc.

· 4 min read

Electron 11.0.0 has been released! It includes upgrades to Chromium 87, V8 8.7, and Node.js 12.18.3. We've added support for Apple silicon, and general improvements. Read below for more details!


The Electron team is excited to announce the release of Electron 11.0.0! You can install it with npm via npm install electron@latest or download it from our releases website. The release is packed with upgrades, fixes, and new support for Apple's M1 hardware.

We can't wait to see what you build with them! Continue reading for details about this release, and please share any feedback you have!

Notable Changes

Stack Changes

Highlight Features

See the 11.0.0 release notes for a full list of new features and changes.

Breaking Changes

  • Removed experimental APIs: BrowserView.{fromId, fromWebContents, getAllViews} and the id property of BrowserView. #23578

More information about these and future changes can be found on the Planned Breaking Changes page.

API Changes

  • Added app.getApplicationInfoForProtocol() API that returns detailed information about the app that handles a certain protocol. #24112
  • Added app.createThumbnailFromPath() API that returns a preview image of a file given its file path and a maximum thumbnail size. #24802
  • Added webContents.forcefullyCrashRenderer() to forcefully terminate a renderer process to assist with recovering a hung renderer. #25756

End of Support for 8.x.y

Electron 8.x.y has reached end-of-support as per the project's support policy. Developers and applications are encouraged to upgrade to a newer version of Electron.

What's Next

In the short term, you can expect the team to continue to focus on keeping up with the development of the major components that make up Electron, including Chromium, Node, and V8. Although we are careful not to make promises about release dates, our plan is to release new major versions of Electron with new versions of those components approximately quarterly. The tentative 12.0.0 schedule maps out key dates in the Electron 12.0 development life cycle. Also, see our versioning document for more detailed information about versioning in Electron.

For information on planned breaking changes in upcoming versions of Electron, see our Planned Breaking Changes doc.

Continued Work for Deprecation of remote Module

We started work to remove the remote module in Electron 9. We plan to remove the remote module itself in Electron 14.

Read and follow this issue for full plans and details for deprecation.

Final Step for Requiring Native Node Modules to be Context Aware or N-API (in Electron 12)

From Electron 6 onwards, we've been laying the groundwork to require native Node modules loaded in the renderer process to be either N-API or Context Aware. Enforcing this change allows for stronger security, faster performance, and reduced maintenance workload. The final step of this plan is to remove the ability to disable render process reuse in Electron 12.

Read and follow this issue for full details, including the proposed timeline.